When does one stop being Dummy?

Last evening, I (South) was dummy and observed East revoke by failing to follow to a Diamond lead at trick 4, actually discarding a Club. Even though she played several more Diamonds during subsequent tricks, no-one commented on it. I know I wasn't allowed to comment and, sure enough, at the end, everyone rapidly scooped up their cards, shuffled them and put them back into the board before I had chance to say "what about the revoke?".
At what precise point do I cease to be dummy and thus become eligible to speak?

Comments

  • As soon as play is over, whether the hand is played out or a claim is made. It's a good idea to be ready to stop anyone from mixing up their cards the moment the final card is played!

  • edited January 26

    You don't have much time either for an automatic adjustment

    There is no automatic trick adjustment following an established revoke (but see Law 64C) if:

    1. attention was first drawn to the revoke after a member of the non-offending side has made a call on the subsequent deal.

    (Law 64C restores equity)

    (To nit-pick with Gordon, when a claim is made play is only suspended. IMHO the claim laws should have included "Play ceases" when the claim is agreed or the claim is disputed and no agreement is reached to resume.)

  • weejonnie, you quote law 64 B 4 but what about 64 B 5? This was the second board of a two-board round. Law 42 B 3 says "only after play is concluded" and law 64 B 5 "after the round has ended". Thus, your first sentence "you don't have much time ..." is correct.

  • Thank you both.

  • edited January 26

    @TawVale said:
    your first sentence "you don't have much time ..." is correct.

    The round does not end as soon as the last card is played. Take a look at Law 8B1 (or 8C if this is the last round). There seems very little danger of Dummy not having enough time to bring attention to the revoke.

  • @weejonnie said:
    (To nit-pick with Gordon, when a claim is made play is only suspended.

    Well dummy is given full rights at that point, because unless dummy agrees, play cannot continue.

  • @gordonrainsford said:

    @weejonnie said:
    (To nit-pick with Gordon, when a claim is made play is only suspended.

    Well dummy is given full rights at that point, because unless dummy agrees, play cannot continue.

    Oh I know that - however it would have been nice to have it in black and white rather than logical deduction)

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