How do you apply a penalty in EBUScore Pairs?

In MrBridge #196, one of the questions for David Stevenson related to a fouled board where, at one table, the players had turned the board through 90 and hence returned their cards to the wrong slots. This happened at my club last week where I was Director/Scorer. As in the MrBridge query this was detected at the next table as we were using Bridgemates with lead detection enabled, and corrected for subsequent tables. I awarded AveragePlus to the one impacted table.
David said that a penalty should be awarded to the miscreants who had returned their cards incorrectly. He recommended 25%.
My question, however, is - how does one apply a penalty in EBUScore Pairs. I can't find any mechanism for doing so. Applying weighted scores doesn't help as that impacts on all other tables. All I could do was send a severe admonishment to the pairs involved. One of the miscreant pairs scored just 1MP on the board - applying a 25% penalty would take their score (on that board) negative! That would be fine, but I don't think EBUSP caters for this!

As an aside, Law 7A states that the board must remain in the centre of the table during play, but there is no Law saying that it shouldn't be turned round!

IanC

Comments

  • Penalties in EBUScore are applied as adjustments: in the Properties panel, the penalties are put in the ADJ column as a negative number of match points. If a top is 14 then 25% of top is a adjustment of -3.5.

    With respect, Law 7A contains the words "correctly oriented".

  • Penalties would be applied as an Adjustment in Properties, against the pairs concerned. Review the Scores page to see what the "Top" is, take 25% of that, and that's the amount of adjustment (negative).

    And, yes, Law 7A does say that the board should not be turned round:

    "When a board is to be played it is placed in the centre of the table where it shall remain, correctly oriented, until play is completed."

  • @IanC said:
    In MrBridge #196, one of the questions for David Stevenson related to a fouled board where, at one table, the players had turned the board through 90 and hence returned their cards to the wrong slots. This happened at my club last week where I was Director/Scorer. As in the MrBridge query this was detected at the next table as we were using Bridgemates with lead detection enabled, and corrected for subsequent tables. I awarded AveragePlus to the one impacted table.
    David said that a penalty should be awarded to the miscreants who had returned their cards incorrectly. He recommended 25%.
    My question, however, is - how does one apply a penalty in EBUScore Pairs. I can't find any mechanism for doing so. Applying weighted scores doesn't help as that impacts on all other tables. All I could do was send a severe admonishment to the pairs involved. One of the miscreant pairs scored just 1MP on the board - applying a 25% penalty would take their score (on that board) negative! That would be fine, but I don't think EBUSP caters for this!

    As an aside, Law 7A states that the board must remain in the centre of the table during play, but there is no Law saying that it shouldn't be turned round!

    IanC

    Go to "Properties" on the main screen.
    Put a minus number in the "Adj" column next to the relevant pair.
    The number is the amount of a top you wish as the penalty.
    It is not applied to an individual board, but to the overall total score for that pair.

  • @Robin_BarkerTD said:
    With respect, Law 7A contains the words "correctly oriented".

    Indeed - I lobbied for this and suggested the wording, precisely because players used to be able to say that there was no law covering the situation.

  • Thank you everybody, especially for such a prompt response.
    My first query and I get two black marks!
    Sorry Robin - I had mislaid/misfiled my current law book so had referred to the old red one.
    I had never noticed that there was a "Properties" option.
    Oh dear - back to school!
    Ian

  • Don’t let it put you off - you are very welcome here and I look forward to future posts from you.
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