Hesitation Movements

I used to see Hesitation Movements as fairly simple ways to extend straight Mitchell movements but now I aware of their negative aspects.

Sadly trying to get Bridge players to follow simple instructions for moving ( or anything else) generally proves to be a classic example of the axiom : Anything that possibly can go wrong will go wrong. The problem, of course, is the arrow switches, all too often not noticed by players. (I've even got it wrong myself - while Directing.)

As an example a 12 table single Hesitation nicely provides 13 rounds of two boards each. Without any arrow switches it would be very straightforward, with 13 moving pairs and eleven sitting NS pairs. My questions are: Would this sort of movement be accepted by the EBU? If so, would it be scored as a two - winner movement?

I haven't attempted to find out how EBUScore would cope.

Alan

Alan

Comments

  • It can't be scored as a two-winner movement because more than half the pairs play in both directions. What's the problem with arrow-switching? It improves the balance. Perhaps you mean that some of these movements are published with irregular arrangements for arrow-switching. Well you could just arrow-switch the final two rounds everywhere except at the switch table.

  • It's the irregular arrangements that are built into EBUScore.
    What I really want is an easy foolproof movement that's easy to use in EBUScore. Intuitively Hesitations are like Mitchells where the split is slightly off 50:50.
    I tend to use Web Mitchell movements a lot more now because players don't have to worry about arrow switches.

    Alan

  • Well if you have difficulty with arrow switching now be prepared for the unexpected.

    For instance you could have the N/S pair on the hesitation table think that they don't move at all. Then you get the next pair moving straight to the next table and the movement has gone up the "spout"! Be prepared for adjusted scores and pairs that can't play boards because their actual opponents have already played the board! If it isn't spotted quickly it certainly puts the movement up the "spout". You should also have two sets of indentical boards as Table 1 shares with Table 12. That also gives difficulties as those at 12 pass the boards to Table 2, an easy difference one would think. Well think again, all sorts can happen!

    If it does go right (well, people don't foul it up) it is an acceptable movement As gordon says it is an acceptable balance.

    Good luck and enjoy your bridge.

    CMOT_Dibbler

  • @16248 said:
    It's the irregular arrangements that are built into EBUScore.
    What I really want is an easy foolproof movement that's easy to use in EBUScore. Intuitively Hesitations are like Mitchells where the split is slightly off 50:50.
    I tend to use Web Mitchell movements a lot more now because players don't have to worry about arrow switches.

    I'm surprised at anyone thinking arrow-switches are things to worry about!

  • @CMOT_Dibbler said:
    Well if you have difficulty with arrow switching now be prepared for the unexpected.

    Good luck and enjoy your bridge.

    CMOT_Dibbler

    I think it's unfortunate to present a useful movement in such a light as to put people off using it.

  • Two points:

    a) as well as the Manning defined hesitations with "optimised" arrow-switching, EBUScore¹ has "Hesitation Mitchell - User-defined Arrowswitch" which lets you do the simple N Rounds A/S [that Gordon mentioned in his first post] by making appropriate selections in the bottom panel.

    b) in my experience, the key to successfully running hesitations (after making sure the field knows this is what's going on) is to engage with the pairs at the hesitation table in the first round, briefing them properly when you start, and being there to help again at the end of round 1. Coming back around to that table on a regular basis helps reinforce the message, as the "chinese whisper" instructions passed on from moving pair to moving pair fade.

    ¹ at least, versions prior to v1.2.1 did - v1.2.1 seems to be missing them! I haven't looked at v1.2.2 or v1.2.3 yet.

  • @SteveFoster said:
    ... EBUScore¹ has "Hesitation Mitchell - User-defined Arrowswitch" which lets you do the simple N Rounds A/S [that Gordon mentioned in his first post] by making appropriate selections in the bottom panel.

    I was going to post the same. ...

    ¹ at least, versions prior to v1.2.1 did - v1.2.1 seems to be missing them! I haven't looked at v1.2.2 or v1.2.3 yet.

    ... But I could not find the movements in 1.2.2 :(

  • @Robin_BarkerTD said:

    ... But I could not find the movements in 1.2.2 :(

    And they're absent from v1.2.3 too. (probably because we've only just discovered that they'd gone AWOL from v1.2.1, so no-one went looking to put them back)

  • They will be back soon! See "EBUScore 1.2.2" thread.

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